Gluten-Free Almond Banana Bread

I’ve been gluten-free for a little over three months. Everything has generally gotten a lot easier since then, but there’s one area of a gluten-free lifestyle that I haven’t really explored yet – gluten-free baking. It just seems rather intimidating, with all the obscure ingredients and just general differences from “normal” baking. Plus, being a dietetic intern, I just haven’t really had a lot of time!

Well, with having today off (Happy Martin Luther King, Jr. Day!), I decided to take my first foray into gluten-free baking last night. And what better novice recipe than banana bread? I researched a lot of options and came up with my own recipe that’s simple, healthy, moist, and delicious. If you’re not sure where to start with gluten-free baking, I recommend with an easy quick bread like this. I hope you enjoy it!

Gluten Free Almond Banana Bread

Gluten-Free Almond Banana Bread (yields 16 slices)

Ingredients:

  • 3 overripe bananas
  • 2 eggs
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 3 cups almond meal
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup cacao nibs (optional – could also use chopped nuts or chocolate chips, or leave out entirely)

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Prepare a loaf pan by liberally spraying it with a nonstick spray (you could also line it with parchment paper, as it can be a little cumbersome to remove from the pan).
  2. Mash the bananas, then add the eggs and honey. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and stir with a fork just until evenly combined. If you wish to add a little crunch, add the cacao nibs or a chopped nut.
  3. Bake for 50 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  4. Let cool, then slice and enjoy!

Nutritional Benefits:

  • This is a pretty high fiber recipe, with fiber contributions from the three main ingredients – bananas, almonds, and cacao nibs!
  • As the only “flour” here is almond meal, it’s a much lower glycemic index recipe than traditional banana bread.
  • Cinnamon is a great addition, as it packs a flavor punch and can also help to control blood sugar.
  • Nutrition Facts: (serves 16) 204 calories, 14.1 gm fat, 2.3 gm saturated fat, 0 trans fat, 0 cholesterol, 37.9 mg sodium, 82.6 mg potassium, 15.8 gm carbohydrates, 5.2 gm fiber, 7.7 gm sugar, 6.8 gm protein

Dietetic Internships: How to Find Preceptors for Distance Programs

One of the most frequently asked questions I get from people emailing via the blog and from acquaintances going through the dietetic internship application process is, “How did you find your preceptors?”

First of all, if you’re not too familiar with dietetic internships, you don’t need to worry about finding your own preceptors for the majority of internships out there. Most internships create your schedule for you, and they tell you where to go and who to report to. This post is mainly for those considering distance internships where you need to source your preceptors and facilities, like the one I’m enrolled in – Utah State University Dietetic Internship. With my internship, I had to find all of my preceptors and have paperwork for everyone submitted by the February 15th application deadline. While it definitely was an additional aspect of something else I had to do on top of the application form, personal statements, resume refining, and more, to me it was worth it and really wasn’t that arduous of a process. So, here are my tips!

  • Start early (if possible). Long story short, I actually didn’t consider applying to distance internships and didn’t begin looking for preceptors until the December before applications were due – and then because of holidays, I really didn’t get to speak to many people until January. While it was definitely a whirlwind, I managed it, but I would definitely advise starting as early as you can!
  • Network at your local dietetic association. If you’re currently living in the city you want to do your internship in, or if you’re able to visit, I recommend going in person to network with local dietitians at your local dietetic association meeting. As I was on a short time frame, I wasn’t able to do this. However, at the meeting I went to last month, there were a couple students who were looking for either preceptors for an elective rotation or students looking for preceptors for their whole internship. Being able to network with a room full of dietitians wanting to help you seemed invaluable to them! Plus, as I’m in a distance internship now and having a great experience, I was able to give several of the students the contact information for my preceptors.
  • Set up meetings with potential preceptors. Again, if you’re able to do this in person, do it!I know other interns that had great experience scheduling meetings with potential preceptors so they could go over the facility, expectations, and more.
  • If out of town, make your initial contact via telephone. This is something that our generation can sometimes have a problem with – most of us are connected to the Internet all the time, and it becomes really easy to just shoot a quick email to someone. Don’t do it! Always, always, always call first, even if you have the person’s email. To be honest, most of the time I just got a voicemail. But, if I happened to have the person’s telephone number and their email, I would leave a voicemail introducing myself, saying that I would also email them my resume for their perusal, and would follow up with them in a week. To me, this worked well. Calling people, especially if it’s requesting an in-person meeting, shows more initiative to your potential preceptors, and that’s what they like to see. In my experience, they want to help you become an RD, but they also don’t want to have to baby you along the way.
  • Email as a follow-up to voicemails. You won’t always have an email address for someone, but if you do, send an email briefly reiterating your voicemail and attaching a copy of your resume. I also tried to include a quick one-liner why I wanted to work there/ with that preceptor when possible (i.e. “I lived in Sarasota when this facility was being built, and I’ve been so impressed to see how the services and reputation have advanced over the years, and would love to learn in such a forward-thinking environment,”). Still – don’t let this be the end-all, be-all. If you’ve left an initial voicemail and email but haven’t heard anything back, follow up a week later (via phone), and just keep trying.
  • Unless you’ve received a, “No,” keep trying. We’re busy. Preceptors are busy. Everyone’s busy. Sometimes you’ll leave dozens of voicemails and messages with people and you won’t hear anything back. Don’t become disheartened and don’t take it personally. Just keep trying. There was one facility that I all but discounted, but over a month later, I finally got a call back from their RD and she was super excited about working with me, but had just gotten tied up with a crazy season at work and kept forgetting to return my calls. So keep trying and don’t give up! (At the same time, don’t be obnoxious. It may be all you can think about, but give at least a week between phone calls, in my opinion.)
  • Ask for help. If you’ve gotten ahold of someone who can’t work with you, ask if they know of any dietitians in the area who may be interested or have worked with interns in the past. I found several of my preceptors this way. One RD wouldn’t be able to accommodate me, but they would know of someone else who had interns the past, and then that RD was able to work with me.
  • Check out email blasts. Ask the president of your local dietetic association if they can send an email blast to all the members on your behalf. This doesn’t always work (it didn’t for me), but I’ve seen it done in other local dietetic associations I’ve been part of in the past. If they agree, keep your email to be forwarded brief, include what you’re looking for (i.e. an 8-week inpatient rotation), and your contact information. I would also attach your resume.
  • Talk with your professors. While this is especially helpful if you’re trying to do your internship in the same city as your university, you never know who your professors know. They may know colleagues or past alumni from the school if the city you’re looking at interning in, and may be able to help you bridge a connection. Any small connection helps tremendously!
  • Social networking. I initially didn’t use this, but I have seen other interns post to discussion boards on LinkedIn looking for any dietitians in their area who could work with them for x-number of weeks. This seems to be especially useful in larger metropolitan areas. I used my social media networks a little bit a month ago, when I found out last minute that a rotation fell through. While it wasn’t the only thing I did, I put a request out on Twitter and Facebook for any suggestions for community nutrition facilities in my county/ surrounding counties. I didn’t get an offer of preceptorship right then and there, but it at least gave me a few more ideas of other places I could call.

While I am sure there are many other things you can do when looking for preceptors, these are the main ones I focused on, and it seemed to work for me – I think I found all of my rotations in less than two months, and that included time off around the holidays when people weren’t around, school, work, volunteering, normal DICAS time-consuming application stuff, etc.

Now, specific places you can contact, if you’re looking for more ideas:

  • Inpatient: hospitals, medical centers, and possibly even rehabilitation centers if they have an inpatient component
  • Outpatient: programs at hospitals (i.e. an outpatient diabetic program), dialysis centers (i.e. Fresenius, DaVita, or any small local companies); outpatient weight loss facilities (MUST have a Registered Dietitian on staff – be careful about these facilities, as not all are medical/ true outpatient facilities)
  • Long-term care: assisted living facilities, skilled nursing facilities, nursing homes, etc. I think the criteria for my internship was that the facility had to have a skilled nursing unit and an Alzheimer’s/ dementia unit.
    • This is the hardest to locate, in my opinion, because so many long-term care facilities only have part-time dietitians. Just keep searching!
  • Community: WIC (try your county and any surrounding counties), Head Start, Meals on Wheels, food banks, senior congregate meal sites, Dairy Council, Beef Council, and extension agencies, or any community/ nutrition programs specific to your state or county.
  • Foodservice Management: school districts participating in the National School Lunch Program, foodservice departments in hospitals, long-term care facilities, etc.
    • Make sure you clarify if your internship requires a specific facility. For my internship, as it has a Child Nutrition focus, I have to do my FSSM rotation at a school district in the NSLP.
  • Elective rotations: research facilities, dietitians in any unique area (i.e. working with a physical therapist), private practice RDs, sports nutrition, etc.
    • Not all internships require/ allow for an elective rotation: see what yours requires!

I apologize for the verbose nature of this post, but hopefully it will be helpful for those of you who are in the shoes I was in one year ago! I promise that no matter how stressful the application process seems, everything will work out, one way or another! Please let me know if you have any other questions! Also – if you’re currently an intern or dietitian and you have any suggestions that I didn’t touch on, please leave them in the comments below!

Sound wishes,

Lindsey

Crisp & Raw Kale Salad

This salad was inspired from a restaurant in nearby Lakewood Ranch called The Polo Grille. They have a really fabulous menu with some creative offerings. I went to The Polo Grille for the first time when my clinical preceptor took me to lunch at the end of my rotation – she was so sweet! The salad I tried was the “Crisp and Raw Kale Salad” made with crispy kale, raw kale, curried almonds, goji berries, and a creamy preserved lemon dressing. I also added chicken to give it a little staying power. It inspired this salad you see hear, which my husband and I enjoyed with some Lentil Chili one night. It has several components, but it really doesn’t take that long to put together – promise!

Crisp and Raw Kale Salad

Crisp & Raw Kale Salad

Kale Chips:

  • 4 cups packed kale (remove the stem and tear into smaller pieces)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • Directions: toss the kale in the olive oil. Spread on a cookie sheet (I places a sheet of foil on mine for quick clean up). Bake at 400 degrees for 15 minutes – kale will be light and crispy when you remove it from the oven.

Crunchy Chickpeas

  • 1 can chickpeas (drained, rinsed, and dried)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • pinch of salt and pepper
  • Directions: Toss the rinsed and dried chickpeas with the olive oil, salt, and pepper. Bake at 400 degrees for 30 minutes – chickpeas will be crunchy and delicious when you take them out of the oven!

Curried Almonds

  • 1/4 cup sliced almonds
  • 1/4 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon curry powder
  • Directions: Combining the ingredients in a skillet, gently toast the almonds over low heat for 3-4 minutes.

Orange Vinaigrette

  • Juice of 1 small orange (1/4 cup)
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • pinch of salt and pepper
  • Directions: Combine all ingredients and whisk (or shake!) until it’s an even mixture.

Crisp & Raw Kale Salad (yields 2 salads)

  • 1 cup kale chips
  • 1 cup raw kale
  • 2 teaspoons curried almonds
  • 2 teaspoons dried cranberries
  • 2 tablespoons crunch chickpeas
  • Orange vinaigrette to taste
  • Directions: Combine the two types of kale, divide into two bowls, then top each bowl with the remaining ingredients.

I hope you guys enjoy it as much as we did! As always – feel free to be creative and play around in the kitchen with whatever ingredients you know you love!

Sound wishes,

Lindsey

Lentil Chili

Sometimes I forget that not everyone is an adventurous eater. And to be quite honest, I really don’t even consider myself that big of an adventurous eater! Between a severe, anaphylactic allergy to tree nuts and an apparent intolerance to gluten that had me living in a bathroom, well – it’s honestly just a lot easier (and in my best interest) to play it safe.

Regardless, I’ve recently learned that I’m apparently still a much more adventurous eater than some. See, I have this friend who is a vegetarian. Over time I’ve come to learn that she’s never tried things like tempeh or lentils, and (up until yesterday) even eggplant and brussels sprouts! So, I’ve personally made it my mission to introduce her to some of these things that I love – like lentils.

This chili is the perfect recipe to do that. First of all – who doesn’t like chili? (Well, unless you’re like my sister and you don’t like beans…if that’s you, just come back tomorrow.) Second, it’s identical to the chili recipe I basically grew up on, with the exception of using lentils instead of ground beef. This has so many advantages – lentils are much cheaper than beef, they’re quick to prepare, they’re much higher in fiber, still a great source of protein, but don’t have all the saturated fat that ground beef has. Plus the chili comes together so quickly since we pre-cook the lentils (the lentils can cook if you add them dry to the whole mixture, but it will take a lot longer to cook when they’re mixed with an acidic ingredient, like tomatoes).

So, vegetarian friend who has never tried lentils: this one’s for you. ;)

Lentil Chili

Lentil Chili

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup dry lentils
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cans kidney beans (rinsed and drained; no added salt/ low sodium preferred)
  • 3 cans diced tomatoes (no added salt/ low sodium preferred)
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon oregano
  • salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Cook the lentils according to the package directions (I cooked mine in the two cups of boiling water for around 15 minutes, or until all the water had been absorbed).
  2. Remove the lentils from your pot and set aside.
  3. Sauté the chopped onion and minced garlic in the olive oil over medium-high heat.
  4. Once the onions have softened, add the lentils, beans, diced tomatoes (including the liquid) and spices back to the pot.
  5. At this point, you can eat whenever, but the longer the chili simmers, the better it will taste. I let mine simmer around 30 minutes.

Nutrition: We got a weird 5 servings out of this, so per serving: 226 kcal, 0.7 g fat, 0.1 g saturated fat, 0 mg cholesterol, 402.7 mg sodium (less if you use unsalted canned beans and tomatoes), 47.7 g carbohydrate, 14.3 g fiber, 4.7 g sugar, 17.2 g protein.

Sound wishes,
Lindsey

Indian Spiced Chicken

Do you ever have one food cuisine that you love whenever you eat it, but for some reason you never really seek it out? That’s Indian food for me. I know, weird. If you invite me to join you for some Indian food, game on – I’m there! But for some reason, the hubs and I never remember this cuisine when we’re facing the age-old question of, “what’s for dinner?”

Well that needs to change. Indian food is so delicious, and it can also be insanely healthy. For example – this chicken recipe. There are so many warm spices and flavors when you bite into this chicken that you don’t even realize that there’s no salt – and in today’s world of salted-everything, that’s a rare occurrence. Plus, many of the spices and herbs have health properties in and of themselves, like the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric (a predominant spice in the curry powder I used).

Indian Spice Rub

Indian Spice Rub

  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon garam marsala
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
  • pinch of cayenne (add as much or as little as you want)

Indian Spiced Chicken

Indian Spiced Chicken
Ingredients:

  • 3.5 pound whole chicken
  • 1/2 sweet onion, sliced
  • 1/2 cup liquid (white wine, broth, water)
  • 1 batch of Indian Spice Rub

Directions:

  1. Slice the sweet onion and place in the bottom of a crock pot. Pour the liquid over the onions.
  2. Clean the chicken (rinse, pat dry with paper towels).
  3. Generously rub the chicken with the Indian spice rub – I like to cover the entire surface, and then get some of the rub under the skin, too. Use all of the spices!
  4. Place the chicken in the crock pot. If need be, you can leave the chicken in the crock pot in the fridge overnight like this, to pop in the crock pot in the morning. When you are ready to get the chicken going, set it on low for 8 hours.

When you come home your house will smell amazing and you’ll have chicken that literally falls off the bone – my husband couldn’t even carve the chicken it was so tender!

We enjoyed ours shredded in some brown basmati rice with some quickly steamed kale, and some of the onions and broth. Simple, fast, and deliciously nutritious. I hope you guys like it as much as we did!

Sound wishes,
Lindsey

Pumpkin Cranberry Bars

So, I bought one can of pumpkin around a month ago, and I just got around to cracking it open. I must be the cliché pumpkin-obsessed, food blogger antithesis. Regardless, I’m happy I finally made something with my pumpkin. From a nutritional standpoint, pumpkin is a great fruit! It’s high in fiber, low in calories, and high in nutrients like potassium, magnesium, vitamin C, and vitamin E. I combined it in this bar recipe with some oats (extra fiber!), almond meal (gluten-free & a healthy fat!), cranberries (hello, antioxidants!) and pumpkin seeds (good for zinc, antioxidants, plus add some nice texture). Pair with a small latte or a hardboiled egg for a well-rounded breakfast.  Not to mention delicious!

Pumpkin Cranberry Bars

Pumpkin Cranberry Bars (yields 9 bars)

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup pumpkin
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup or honey
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1.5 cups oats
  • 1/2 cup almond meal
  • 1/4 cup ground flaxseeds
  • 1 Tbs. maca powder (optional – can simply omit if you don’t have any)
  • 1 Tbs. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/4 cup raw pumpkin seeds

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and prepare a 9×9” pan by lightly spraying it with a nonstick spray.
  2. Combine the wet ingredients (pumpkin, almond milk, honey, egg, vanilla). Add the dry ingredients (oats, almond meal, flaxseeds, maca powder, cinnamon, baking powder) and stir to combine. Once ingredients are combined, add the cranberries and pumpkin seeds and stir until evenly distributed.
  3. Using a spatula, spread batter evenly in the prepared dish.
  4. Bake for 30 minutes.
  5. Cut into 9 squares. Once cooled, store the bars in the fridge.

Nutrition (per 1 bar): 213 calories, 12.7 g fat, 1.2 g saturated fat, 21.1 mg cholesterol, 60.3 mg sodium, 23 g carbohydrate, 5.4 g fiber, 9.4 g sugar, 7.1 g protein.

Hasta la Vista, Lab Coat!

Anddddd with that, my clinical rotation is done! I started on July 29th, and yesterday, October 25th, I hung up my lab coat (for now) as it marked the last day of my inpatient and staff relief, bringing my clinical rotation to a close. I’ll be back later with some recaps of my clinical rotation and how it went, but for now I just wanted to pop in and say hi!

I’ve really missed writing in this space! Not only did life get busy with the end of my clinical rotation, but I had to very quickly re-arrange my next rotation when my planned facility cancelled on me last minute. So needless to say, I’m now ready to come back and share everything! Some posts you’ll see soon:

  • A remake of my old Lentil Chili recipe that got lost when I transferred my blog.
  • Recaps of my inpatient and staff relief clinical rotations
  • A post on how to find preceptors/ facilities for a distance dietetic internship (I can’t tell you how many emails and conversations I have about this!)
  • A re-make of an amazing salad I tried at a local restaurant recently – think kale, goji berries, lemon, and curried almonds. Really reignited my inspiration to get back in the kitchen!
  • A post on GI issues and why I’m now gluten-free (words I never thought I’d say…)
  • My personal suggestions on the dietetic internship application/ interview process (if you have any specific questions, let me know!)

Also – if you’ve emailed me recently, I promise I’ll be getting back to you soon! Apologies for delays. :)

And with that, I’m off to go start some work for my community/ public health rotation, and then go make a fall wreath for my front door with my momma! Enjoy this beautiful fall weather, y’all!

Sound wishes,
Lindsey

Roasted Eggplant Quinoa Pilaf

Several weeks ago I went to see a patient to offer some diet education. This patient was as sweet as could be and immediately wanted to chat about anything and everything nutrition – I loved it! In the course of our conversation, the patient brought up quinoa, mentioning they just tried it, and wondered if it OK to eat, how do you even make it, etc. Of course I went on to say that if you like quinoa, it’s a great food, and very easy to make! I was sharing different ways you could eat it (plain as a side, cooked with herbs, mixed in soup, as a breakfast oatmeal substitute, in a pilaf, etc.), and as I shared the idea of a pilaf, I made a mental note to make my own quinoa pilaf soon. So that’s exactly what I did! I used a beautiful neon eggplant (unfortunately the vibrant color doesn’t translate after roasting) and some quinoa, and a delicious side dish soon graced my dinner table.

Roasted Eggplant Quinoa Pilaf

Roasted Eggplant Quinoa Pilaf (serves 6-8)

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup quinoa (measured dry)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 cup unsalted vegetable broth
  • 1 medium eggplant (diced should yield around 4 cups)
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon herbs de Provence
  • salt, pepper

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Toss the diced eggplant with olive oil and lightly season with salt and pepper. Roast for 20-30 minutes, until eggplant is soft and tender.
  3. Prepare the quinoa according to package directions – I simmered mine in half water, half vegetable broth.
  4. When both the quinoa and eggplant are done, toss together with the herbs de Provence seasoning, and any additional salt or pepper if needed.

Tips:

  • This is also delicious with a drizzle of balsamic vinegar or balsamic reduction. Extra delicious with a shaving of fresh Parmesan cheese.
  • While it can be served cold, we liked it warm.
  • Makes for great lunches! Add some chicken or tuna and serve over spinach.
  • Add any fresh herbs you desire – the flavor will just pop in this dish!

Sound wishes,
Lindsey

Wine Braised Beef

Sunday nights are reserved for meals that may take a little more time and a little more effort. .Nothing crazy, mind you – I don’t have that much free time! But it’s kind of fun and therapeutic for me to just chill and invest in some kitchen therapy. I truly love being in the kitchen!

This Sunday’s dinner took a little research. We bought a steak and on the package it had a label saying that it’d be great for braising. Well, I didn’t recall ever braising any meat before, so it took some research. The Reluctant Gourmet has a great post called “How to Braise Everything”, including a great description of what braising is and how/ why it works. Basically, it’s a method of slow cooking that yields tender results from cuts of meat that may otherwise be pretty tough. All you really need to do is season your meat, sear it, then barely cover the surface with a liquid (broth, beer, wine, coconut milk, etc.) then cook it a low temperature for a long time. There ya go – braising 101. ;)

Wine Braised Beef

While, to be honest, I’m not sure how “legit” this recipe is, it was delicious and worked for us. One place I read recommended about 1.25 hours for a thin steak (<1 inch) like the one I had, but honestly I think I could have let it cook even longer. If you ever try braising yourself, be sure to just look up recommended times for the weight and thickness of your steak!

Wine Braised Beef

Wine Braised Beef (serves 3)

Ingredients:

  • 0.75 lb Angus beef top round steak
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1 tablespoon oil (high heat, like canola or grapeseed)
  • 1 cup red wine (I used a merlot)
  • 1/2 sweet onion, sliced
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

Directions:

  • Preheat the oven to 300 degrees.
  • Heat the oil in a heavy skillet or dutch oven over high heat.
  • Generously season the steak on both sides with salt and pepper (If need be, cut your steak to fit into the pan – I cut mine in thick strips).
  • Sear the steak for a couple minutes on each side. Remove the steak, add the wine, and deglace the pan. Add the steak back in, cover the dish, and place it in the oven. Cook for 45 minutes.
  • After 45 minutes, add the onions, mushrooms and oregano to the dish, re-cover and allow the meat to braise for another 30-45 minutes.
  • The steak should be fork-tender when it is done.

I hope you enjoy! I’m already dreaming up my next adventure in braising. Maybe a bone-in chicken breast braised in a coconut milk curry??

Sound wishes,
Lindsey

Lemon Chicken Dinner

This is a new favorite “recipe”. I say recipe in quotes, because really it’s just one of those baseline recipe formats, where you can substitute whatever you want. We’ve made it multiple times and I love it for a relatively easy dinner, plus as many delicious leftovers as I want! You can use whatever vegetables you want or have on hand, and heck – you could probably even use fish or pork chops (or tofu!) instead of chicken!

Lemon Chicken Dinner

Lemon Chicken Dinner (serves 4, can easily be adapted to serve 6 or 8)

Ingredients:

  • 6-8 cups vegetables (I used yellow summer squash, sweet Vidalia onion, a Russet potato, and half an eggplant)
  • 4 small chicken breasts (if a chicken breast is very large, I typically just cut it in half)
  • 1 lemon
  • Olive oil
  • Seasonings (I use salt, pepper, garlic, oregano, cumin, and paprika)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Slice the lemon into thin slices (remove seeds).
  3. Chop all of your vegetables and place them in the bottom of an 8×8” pan (or 9×13” if you’re doubling your batch!). Gently toss them with a drizzle (about a teaspoon) of olive oil and a small sprinkling of salt, pepper, garlic powder, and oregano).
  4. Place the chicken breasts on top of the vegetables. Lay the lemon slices on top of the chicken.
  5. Drizzle the chicken with olive oil, pepper, paprika, and cumin.
  6. Bake in the oven for 35-45 minutes, or until potato pieces are tender and chicken reaches 165 degrees.
  7. Enjoy!

DSC_0906

Let me know if you come up with any other fun variations! Once it gets a little cooler here, I’d love to make one with butternut squash, sweet onion, and maybe asparagus – yum!

Sound wishes,
Lindsey